Amateur NS astronomer captures magic of green comet IG News

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Tim Duckett with the Deep Sky Eye Observatory in southwestern Nova Scotia captured a dazzling time-lapse of a green comet making a rare pass near Earth.

Comet C/2022 E3 (ZTF) is making its closest approach to Earth on Wednesday

Green light appears in the starry sky.
Tim Duckett captured a two-hour lapse of the green comet over the weekend. (Tim Duckett / Deep Sky Eye Observatory)

An amateur astronomer in southwestern Nova Scotia has captured a dazzling time-lapse of a green comet making a rare pass near Earth.

The last time a comet came this close to our planet was 50,000 years ago. Many Canadians have been watching the stars this week as the comet gets ready to make its closest approach on Wednesday.

Tim Doucette with the Deep Sky Eye Observatory near Yarmouth, NS, is one of them.

They spent two hours observing the comet in the early morning hours of 28 January.

“If you have a telescope and look closely at the comet and the background stars, it’s traveling across our sky at about one-quarter of a degree per hour,” he told CBC Radio Mainstreet Halifax, “So within a few minutes you can see that the comet is actually moving across the night sky.”

You can listen to Duckett’s full interview with host Jeff Douglas here:

Mainstreet NS8:09Astronomer Tim Doucette photographs rare green comet

A rare green comet that orbits our sun once every 50,000 years is now in our neighborhood, and already one amateur astronomer has captured its dazzling imagery.

Amateur NS astronomer captures magic of green comet

Tim Duckett with the Deep Sky Eye Observatory in southwestern Nova Scotia captured a dazzling time-lapse of a green comet making a rare pass near Earth.

With files from CBC Radio’s Main Street Halifax

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