The KILAW conference examined the theories of “apparent” and “separation of powers”

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The KILAW conference examined the theories of “apparent” and “separation of powers”

Sections: “The Apparent Theory” and Islamic Law since 644 and the first rule in England to apply it 1341

The Eighth Annual International Conference of the Kuwait International Law School KILAW completed its sessions for the second day in a row, held under the title “Historical Roots of Legal Theories and Codes”, under the patronage of the Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Justice and Minister of State for Integrity Promotion.

Yesterday, 9 sessions were held on the second and last day of the conference, with the participation of a number of academics and researchers specialized in various branches of law.

Ambassador Al-Suleiman with the President and members of the French-Gulf Friendship Committee

The eighth session was chaired by the Vice President of the College and the former Minister of Commerce and Industry, Dr. Yousef Al-Ali.

The president of the college, Dr. Muhammad Al-Muqati’, spoke about the “historical roots of the apparent theory in Islam,” pointing to the apparent theory in Islamic law and its applications through the apparent theory, good faith and bad faith, the apparent theory and the effects it entails (right – authority – legal center) apparent theory among Islamic jurisprudence. and legal blogging.

He also talked about the apparent theory and historical origin, how and when the apparent theory arose in its voluntIG applications, pointing to the attribution of the theory to the French State Council in 1891 and the spread of the theory and its application in Canada in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, referring to the first ruling in England to apply the theory 1341.

He referred to Islamic law and the apparent theory since 644, speaking about the apparent theory in Islamic law and its applications at the constitutional, political and civil law levels.

For his part, Dr. Lavi Dradkeh from the Faculty of Law at Yarmouk University in Jordan presented on “the role of the theory of apparent situations in protecting the parties to legal relations arising from the commercial paper: a comparative study.”

Dr. Mustafa Makki from the Faculty of Law at Sorbonne University also participated on “Freedom of Contract and Public Order: An In-Depth Reading in Developments and Variables”, and Dr. Faraj Hammouda from the Faculty of Law at the University of Tripoli.

The ninth session was chaired by the SecretIG-General of the Kuwait Banks Federation, Dr. Hamad Al-Hasawi, which was titled “The Legal Historical Development of the Theory of Necessity and Some of Its Applications.”

The head of the Department of Comparative Jurisprudence and Islamic Studies from the college, Dr. Iqbal Al-Mutawa, spoke about the historical development of the theory of necessity and its objective controls in Islamic jurisprudence and positive law.

As for Dr. Anthony Colin from Middlesex University School of Law from the speaking kingdom, he spoke about the militIG necessity of the duties of international humanitarian law: Reflections on the historical origins of the concept.

Dr. Jenan Al-Baroudi from the Faculty of Law at the Lebanese University presented a working paper entitled “The Theory of Necessity and its Applications in Economic Crises: The Role of International Jurisprudence in Determining the Conditions for Paying State Responsibility for the Economic Crisis Based on the Case of Necessity.”

Finally, Dr. Ismail Namiq from the College of Law at the University of Sulaymaniyah in Iraq presented a paper entitled “The Theory of Pandemics in Islamic Jurisprudence”.

The tenth session was held under the title “Social Contract Theory and the Principle of Separation of Powers”, chaired by National Assembly member Dr. Abdul Karim Al-Kandari, and Dr. Anas Al-Mashishi from Mohammed bin Abdullah University in the Kingdom of Morocco spoke.

and Dr. Khaled Madi from the College of Law at United Arab Emirates University, who shed light on the issue of the historical and intellectual origins of the system of separation of powers and modern and future transformations, pointing to the multiple roots of the idea of ​​separation of powers, including historical and intellectual roots.

He pointed to the new challenges and transformations facing the separation of powers system, pointing out that the separation of powers system is effective.

Dr. Laith Nasraween spoke about “constitutional litigation procedures as a guarantee to protect the principle of legality between historical and contemporIG rooting: a comparative study.”

Dr. Catelyn Mahoney of the University of CalgIG School of Law in Canada discussed “Indigenous Peoples: Their Place in the Canadian Legal System,” referring to the principle of legal pluralism and indigenous traditions.

Noura Al-Farhan from the Kuwait International Law School presented the historical development of the role of the constitutional judiciIG in light of the principle of separation of powers: an analytical study of the ruling of the Constitutional Court 15/2020.

The eleventh session discussed the topic of “Theories of Economic Rights and State Intervention in the Economy”, in which Dr. Adnan Al Mulla from the International College of Law spoke about the historical roots, legal and legal foundations, and a statement of the legal origin of the ruling on participation in mixed companies.

Dr. Badr El-Din Abdullah from the College of Judicial Systems and Studies at the Islamic University of Madinah addressed the historical and realistic aspects of codifying and codifying international health rules.

Dr. Bilal Al-Sanadid from the Kuwait International Law School spoke about the intellectual, religious and legal roots of economic and social rights and their applications in Kuwait.

Azra Al-Adwani, from the college, dealt with the historical roots of the state’s intervention in the economy and its developments in light of the theory of state sovereignty, state intervention in the economy and its developments, and cooperation between the two authorities.

The session was chaired by Dr. Mark Martinezen, Dean of the Faculty of Law, University of Belfast, UK.

Dr. Erdit Memiti from the Kuwait International Law School, Dr. Masoud Sooudi from the Faculty of Law at Jean Moulin University in France, Dr. Judith Spiegel from the Kuwait International Law School, Dr. Nikolaos Teodorakis from Oxford University in the United Kingdom, and Dr. Eunice Geokaris from the Faculty of Law at the University of Nicosia.

Dr. Khaled Al-Yaqout from the Kuwait International Law School sheds light on the topic of the impact of “the idea of ​​humanitarian intervention on the theory of territorial sovereignty in international law.”

The thirteenth session of the conference was held under the title “Theories and Principles of Criminal Law: Historical Stations and Procedural and Objective Applications” chaired by the Chairman of the College’s Board of Trustees, Dr. Badr Al-Khalifa. Dr. Sami Al-Rawashdeh from the College of Law at Qatar University spoke about it.

And Dr. Moaz Al-Mulla, director of the Law Diploma Program at the Kuwait International Law School. and Dr. Muhammad Al-Awa from the College of Law at Abu Dhabi University. and Dr. Stephen Ferrolo, former dean of the University of San Diego School of Law. and Dr. Carrie Leonetti from the University of Auckland Law School in New Zealand.

The fourteenth session was titled “Transitional Justice, Alternative Punishments and Criminal Policy: Historic Transformations” and was chaired by the Dean of the College, Dr. Faisal Al-Kandari.

Dr. Sharifa Al-Muhanna from the college spoke about it.

And Dr. Mamdouh Al-Anzi from Shaqra University, Saudi Arabia.

and Dr. Omar Al-Hadithi from Kingdom University in Bahrain.

And Dr. Zakia Al-Oumri from Hassan II University of Morocco.

It was concluded by Aisha Al-Qassar from the Kuwait International Law College.

The fifteenth session was held under the title “Codification of Islamic Jurisprudence and Its Effects: Flexible Applications and Pioneering Jurisprudence” chaired by Dr. Yousef Al-Sharrah from the Faculty of Sharia at Kuwait University, and Dr. Abdul Hameed Al-Baali, HonorIG Dean of the Kuwait International Law School, participated in it.

and Dr. Saleh Al-Ali from the College of Sharia and Islamic Studies at Kuwait University,

and Dr. Sona Ebadi from the Faculty of Sharia and Law at the International University of Islamic Sciences in Jordan.

Student and researcher research

The sixteenth and closing session of the conference, entitled Research of Students and Researchers, was chaired by the Deputy Dean for Scientific Affairs at the Kuwait International Law College, Dr. Yousry Al-Assar.

And Omar Al-Abdul-Jader, a teaching assistant at the Faculty of Law at Kuwait University, participated in it. Muhammad Al-Failakawi, Master of Public Law, at the College also spoke about the criminal responsibility arising from the mishandling of virtual currencies and its risks to the Capital Markets Authority: a legal analytical study.

Finally, Abdulaziz Al-Fadhli, a BA student at the college, spoke about the theory of the social contract and the principle of separation of powers: separation or overlap between powers in historical and contemporIG political systems.


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